Main Menu
Posts in Estate Planning.
Posted in Estate Planning

You might have heard before that the sins of the father shall be visited upon the sons.  This was certainly the case in a decision recently handed down by the Wyoming Supreme Court.  

In E.G.W. v. First Federal Savings Bank of Wyoming, 413 P.3d 106 (3/15/18), the Court upheld and enforced a “no-contest” clause in a grandfather’s Revocable Trust, which resulted in two minor grandchildren forfeiting their shares of the Trust due to their father filing a trust contest.   

Posted in Estate Planning

A recent Rhode Island case illustrates the need to carefully exercise any power of appointment retained by a grantor over a trust.  Jaffe v. Pournaras, 178 A.3d 978 (2/23/18).

In this case, the Grantor had created an irrevocable trust in 2003, naming his son as the Trustee.  Under the terms of the Trust, the Grantor retained a power to appoint its assets to or for the benefit of his descendants, in any shares and amounts he would direct. 

Posted in Estate Planning

The recently enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) allows each individual to exempt $11,180,000 from federal estate tax in 2018 ($11,400,000 in 2019). A married couple would need over $22,000,000 in assets before their estate would be subject to federal estate tax. With less individuals owing federal estate tax, you may wonder, “Do I need an estate plan if my estate will not be taxed?” The answer is yes, you do need an estate plan because your estate plan is much more than a tool to reduce federal estate taxes. Regardless of the size of your estate, below are five reasons why you need an estate plan.

Posted in Estate Planning

Use of a Pay on Death (“POD”) beneficiary designation is often touted as a way to simplify transfers of assets at your death.  If a bank account or CD is put in the name of “Father POD Son,” then the asset will transfer automatically to Son at the death of Father.

Posted in Estate Planning

In a recent Florida Appeals decision, Landau v. Landau, a trustee who failed to file proper and complete trust accountings for two years, and to file trust income tax returns for the same two years, was hit with a freeze of the trust assets by the Court. Because the trustee was also the lifetime income beneficiary of the trust, this freeze effectually prevented the trustee from using the trust for his own support.

Posted in Estate Planning

Many people want to leave the substantial wealth they have accumulated in retirement accounts in trust for their beneficiaries, rather than having the retirement accounts pass outright to them.  However, the IRS has established extremely complicated rules governing when retirement plan, IRA and Section 403(b) annuity contracts payable to a trust can be distributed over the life expectancy of one of the trust beneficiaries, rather than under the general five year distribution time limit.

Posted in Estate Planning

The South Dakota Supreme Court recently decided a unique case which may be persuasive to jurists in many other states that have adopted the Uniform Trust Code, particularly as it relates to literal compliance with shortened time frames for beneficiaries to take action under the Code. In doing so, the Court ruled that an informal objection to a revocable trust did not constitute an effective contest of the trust’s validity under their trust law, because it was not a timely filed suit. 

Posted in Estate Planning

It is becoming increasingly common for beneficiaries to want to create a power to remove trustees of their trusts, when the trust agreement does not grant them this power. 

In states which have adopted it, the Uniform Trust Code does grant a statutory power of removal to the trust beneficiaries, even when the governing trust document does not bestow such removal power itself.  However, such statutory powers generally require court approval and compliance with certain criteria. 

Posted in Estate Planning

In Private Letter Ruling 201737008, issued by the IRS on September 15, 2017, the Service gave retroactive tax effect to a court modification of the power of appointment held by the donor’s spouse over the donor’s trust.  Based on the retroactive County Court modification in this ruling, the surviving spouse’s power of appointment over the trust was held to be a special power of appointment for tax purposes from the trust’s inception, thereby avoiding estate taxation on the trust assets in the taxable estate of the spouse at her later death. 

Posted in Estate Planning

The U. S. Tax Court recently upheld the right of the IRS to adjust the amount of the unused estate tax exemption left by the predeceased spouse, when computing the federal estate tax owed by the estate of the surviving spouse.

RSS RSS Feed

Subscribe

Recent Posts

Categories

Contributors

Archives

Back to Page